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Queen's Birthday Special: The Business Of Monarchy

85 years young in 2012, with sixty of those spent on the throne, The Queen is the epitome of commitment to a profession. We take a look at the books of one of England's best-loved bosses.

What's the cost of being a royal? And how has Queen Elizabeth II altered her strategy in the sixty years she's been running one of the cultural and economic powerhouses of the world? Here are some neat facts you might not know about the business of being The Business: 

1. Press the flesh or forget the rest

Despite her age, The Queen frequently travels and shows up at every event she is required. She's been at every opening of Parliament since the fifties with the exception of the two times she was heavily pregnant, has travelled to Commonwealth territories including Jamaica, Canada and Australia over two hundred times. She's given 91 State Banquets, 387,000 awards and honours and sent 100,000 telegrams to centenarians (those who reach 100 years of age) across the Commonwealth. And she's one of the only monarchs to have visited a Mosque, hung out with astronauts and started her own diplomatic effort to meet regular people when abroad, 'the Royal walkabout tour'.

2. You have to be prepared for boredom if you want results.

Every company head has to bite the bullet at some point and deal with the paperwork and bureaucracy that comes with being in charge. The Queen is no exception; during her reign she's sat for official portraits 129 times, given Royal Assent to nearly four thousand acts of Parliament and had to listen to Prince Charles talk every day since he learned how. That is some achievement. 

3. Adaptation is crucial (even in the House of Windsor)

The sixty years of Queen Elizabeth's tenure have been the most some of the most tumultuous in history. Rather than steadfastly refusing to 'get with the times', she's gone out of her way to change strategy when the need arises. As nations began splintering from the former British Empire, The Queen helped position England into a new role as part of the Commonwealth. Her Christmas address became a podcast in 2006, and now Buckingham Palace has it's own YouTube channel and Facebook page. A young Elizabeth also learned to fix cars during World War II. 

4. Keep up with your hobbies

If there's one thing The Queen loves more than her country, it's corgis. She's had over thirty of the dogs since ascending the throne in the fifties, and has famously created her own breed of Royal dogs by mating two of her favourites (a corgi and a daschund) into what are now called 'dorgis'. She's also a fan of horses since George V gave her a pony as a child; those bred in the Royal Stables have won races nearly every season for the last twenty-five years.

5. Succession planning is a nightmare for everyone

Despite being the longest-reigning monarchs in recent memory, Elizabeth II is aware that at one point she will have to hand over the throne to a successor. There is currently much debate in the UK (as there has been for years) over whether Charles, next in line, or William, his son, should take over in the event of The Queen's passing. At her Diamond Jubilee recently, commentators remarked that she should only want the next sixty years to be as stable and good for Britain as the last. The real question is, who's going to look after the corgis?

The sixty years of Queen Elizabeth's tenure have been the most some of the most tumultuous in history. Rather than steadfastly refusing to 'get with the times', she's gone out of her way to change strategy when the need arises. As nations began splintering from the former British Empire, The Queen helped position England into a new role as part of the Commonwealth. Her Christmas address became a podcast in 2006, and now Buckingham Palace has it's own YouTube channel and Facebook page. A young Elizabeth also learned to fix cars during World War II. 

Every company head has to bite the bullet at some point and deal with the paperwork and bureaucracy that comes with being in charge. The Queen is no exception; during her reign she's sat for official portraits 129 times, given Royal Assent to nearly four thousand acts of Parliament and had to listen to Prince Charles talk every day since he learned how. That is some achievement.  The sixty years of Queen Elizabeth's tenure have been the most some of the most tumultuous in history. Rather than steadfastly refusing to 'get with the times', she's gone out of her way to change strategy when the need arises. As nations began splintering from the former British Empire, The Queen helped position England into a new role as part of the Commonwealth. Her Christmas address became a podcast in 2006, and now Buckingham Palace has it's own YouTube channel and Facebook page. A young Elizabeth also learned to fix cars during World War II. 
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